For the most up to date information visit: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/keythingstoknow.html?s_cid=10493:covid%2019%20vaccination:sem.ga:p:RG:GM:gen:PTN:FY21

Covid-19 Treatment and Prevention

You can find more information on coronavirus on our education page at https://www.newerahh.com/education/

Coronavirus is a respiratory disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. So how does covid-19 spread? A person infected with coronavirus (covid-19) can spread infection through the mouth or nose by sneezing, coughing, talk and/or speaking. 

You can take simple precautions to minimize the spread of coronavirus. 

Youtube video link: https://youtu.be/DCdxsnRF1Fk (This video has been reviewed by NEHH and is provided as a form of education. It is not intended to replace advice given to you by your primary care provider).

Covid-19 vaccine

There is a great concern being expressed in our communities over the covid-19 vaccine. Most of these concerns involve safety and the speed at which the vaccine was developed. In this article, we will dive into how the vaccine was developed, who can receive the coronavirus vaccine, and what the center for disease control and prevention says about safety.

Developing a vaccine for covid -19

Vaccines have been around for many decades. Before, vaccines would take nearly a decade to research, test, and produce. The covid-19 vaccine was developed in only a few months and cleared for emergency use. So how was this possible?
The secret behind this science is in a type of vaccine that has been researched and developed over the last decade. These are the mRNA vaccines. Messenger Ribonucleic Acid (mRNA) vaccines use our own bodies’ cells to create immunity from viruses that cause infections. Traditional vaccines contain weakened or amputated sections of live viruses. Both of these methods require extensive research and preparation. Because mRNA is a naturally occurring molecule in our bodies’ cells, researchers developed a way to encode millions of mRNA molecules with a specific viral protein. In this case, the coronavirus viral protein. This is how scientists and researchers have been able to develop a covid vaccine this quickly. It is important to note, these viral proteins are harmless by themselves, but they help our body create an immune response. This immune response can cause fever, fatigue, and muscle soreness in some people. These are normal reactions that mean the vaccine is working.

Youtube Video Links: https://youtu.be/V-NEr3KCug8 (This video has been reviewed by NEHH and is provided as a form of education. It is not intended to replace advice given to you by your primary care provider).

Key things to know about the covid vaccine

Bullet points and links provide by CDC. More information at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/keythingstoknow.html?s_cid=10493:covid%2019%20vaccination:sem.ga:p:RG:GM:gen:PTN:FY21

Safety of vaccines

For more information visit: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/safety-of-vaccines.html

Youtube Video Link: https:/youtu.be/7bBmQaX2k4w (This video has been reviewed by NEHH and is provided as a form of education. It is not intended to replace advice given to you by your primary care provider.)

As always! We are here to help. At NEHH we strive to provide education and make information readily available. This information is not intended to replace advice given to you by your primary care provider.
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References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (n.d.). Safety of covid-19 vaccines. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved December 3, 2021, from https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/safety-of-vaccines.html. 

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